Mint Julep – Charity Donation

 In Abstracts, Oils, Recent Works, Red's Art, Softer Side

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Medium: Oil

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So you probably know that the mint julep has a Southern origin and a long association with the Kentucky Derby.

In addition, the mint julep is a mixed alcoholic drink, or cocktail, consisting primarily of bourbon, sugar, water, crushed or shaved ice, and fresh mint. As a bourbon-based cocktail, it is associated with the American South and the cuisine of the Southern United States in general,  And of course, the Kentucky Derby. For Juleps are traditionally served in silver cups, probably because it keeps the drinker colder and is refreshing in the face of the South’s heat.

Did you know, the mint julep has been promoted by Churchill Downsin association with the Kentucky Derby since 1938. Indeed, each year almost 120,000 juleps are served at Churchill Downs over the two-day period of the Kentucky Oaks and the Kentucky Derby. In addition, virtually all of them are made in special Kentucky Derby collectible glasses.

Mint Julep’s – a Stomach Ailment

Also, its history extends well into the early nineteenth century. Can you believe it, the drink started as a medicine for stomach ailments. For, the first mention of the drink in the U.S. comes from John Davis’ book “Travels of Four Years and a Half in the United States: 1798-1802”. It was a morning eye-opener consumed in Virginia.

Woodford Reserve’s master distiller, Chris Morris, points out that “centuries ago, there was an Arabic drink called julab. This drink made with water and rose petals. For, the beverage had a delicate and refreshing scent that people thought would instantly enhance the quality of their lives. In the Mediterranean, indigenous mint replaced the rose petals and the “mint julep” rose in popularity.

Even Ernest Hemingway, supposedly cantankerous with drink, allegedly smashed a glass against a wall in a French barroom and bellowed: “Doesn’t anyone in this godforsaken country know how to make a mint julep?”

So perhaps you can see why I named this particular painting “Mint Julep”.  As you can see, the cool mint colors seem to float within the white background just like a Mint Julep in a cup of crushed ice.

Note: This painting was created with only my fingers; no brush or palette knife was used.

Dare to Feel, 

Red

See more of Red’s Creations in her gallery.

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